Category: DEFAULT


Download Greensleeves and Yellow Lace  - The City Waites - The Mufitians of Grope Lane (CD)
1996
Label: Columns Musica Oscura - 070969 • Series: The Purcell Circle • Format: CD • Country: UK • Genre: Classical •

Lucie Skeaping originally wanted to be the virtuoso violinist Ida Haendel bat gave up that ambition having played in one freezing church too many. After the Royal College of Music, where she studied the lute with Diana Poulton and wore hot pants, she took the natural step of joining the Ken Dodd dancers, working in variety with Ivan Ivanovich The Smallest Strongman in the World and touring Europe with the pre punk all girl band The Sadista Sisters, before the big time finally beckoned by presenting BBC television's Playschool.

Luckily she was saved when she discovered broadside ballads and has never looked back. She also specialises in singing traditional Jewish music with her other group The Burning Bush and, as a frequent BBC broadcaster she appears on arts programmes including her own weekly series on early and traditional music.

Roddy Skeaping's entire family invented Early Music in the s and he is constantly mistaken for his three brothers who all share the same spectacles. Well known for his inventive incidental music for various National Theatre productions, his own nightly performances there included gripping a violin bow between his teeth and spinning a plate on the end, whilst playing a tune. From shampoo factory to John Dowland, the road has been hard and long for Douglas Wootton.

From his pony- tail to his blue suede shoes, Douglas was having no nonsense. Not for him the Laura Ashley school of Early Music; not for him the usual conventions of the concert platform: when Douglas gets an audience he squeezes it until the pips squeak - and they love it.

One of the few tenors to accompany himself on the lute, he also writes musicals for children. Michael Brain was a chorister at Westminster Abbey and it was downhill all the way after that. He is a fantastic roadie, tour manager, route planner and hassler for asparagus quiche the Official Gig Food.

He is also a superlative curtal player, baroque bassoonist, recorder and oboe player, continuing an illustrious family line which includes the famed horn player Dennis Brain. Although he loves The City Waites he is proud to have large quantities of what he calls 'outside work' and never fails to remind the band - at moments of artistic tension - that he could be employed elsewhere. On stage his big moment comes when he describes the construction of early woodwind instruments, and he talks with particular relish about the 'U-bend' at the base of the curtal - not unrelated to his other major talent for putting in bathroom plumbing.

Cover image: "Before the orgy" by Zichy courtesy www. Lucie Skeaping soprano; baroque violin Douglas Wootton: tenor; lute; bandora; cittern; tabor Roddy Skeaping: baroque violin; bass viol; voice; musical arrangements Michael Brain baroque bassoon; recorders; voice Robin Jeffrey baroque guitar; cittern Mike Sargeant early Northumbrian bagpipes; Flemish bagpipes David Chatterley hurdy-gurdy. Conditions of Use. The City Waites Taking their name from the professional town musicians of earlier times, The City Waites specialise in the songs and dances of the street and countryside, the stage and tavern - the music of the common man.

Energetic Happy Hypnotic. Romantic Sad Sentimental. Sexy Trippy All Moods. Drinking Hanging Out In Love. Introspection Late Night Partying. Rainy Day Relaxation Road Trip. Romantic Evening Sex All Themes. Articles Features Interviews Lists. Streams Videos All Posts. My Profile. Advanced Search. Release Date August 27, Genre Classical.

Styles Vocal Music Chamber Music. Recording Location The Premises, London. Track Listing. Diddle Diddle or the Kind Country Lovers. Anonymous, English. The Fair Maid of Islington. Green Stockings. One such is the scene where Henry sits with a lute, composing Greensleeves , which we then hear being sung in the background. There is absolutely no evidence for this, that words and music were written separately, nor that Henry wrote the words. Dog-heads, microwaves and rats: anything claimed without evidence can be dismissed without evidence.

The idea is that the very name Greensleeves shows her to be an amorous romper in the grass at the very least and, at worst, a prostitute. An oft-cited song in the general context of the symbolism of women in green clothes is The Gown of Green , by which people often mean The answer to The gown of green , which is a slightly later and different song. No matter here, as both broadside ballads serve to make the same point in relation to Greensleeves.

Taphouse and Son, , the verses about the war are clearly shoe-horned in, signifying an original older song. The song begins:. The broadside, The answer to The gown of green , first printed in the late 18 th century, ends with the lines:.

The expression is not confined to Scotland, but prevails in the north of England. This is the late 18 th century and mid 19 th century, and the cultural currency of words and phrases changes over time. How far back does this idea go? The final verse leaves us in no doubt:. Before we examine whether this idea stretches back to Greensleeves and is the intended meaning there, I have sometimes read the claim that Tudor or renaissance prostitutes or courtesans wore green to advertise their services, or perhaps just wore green sleeves on renaissance gowns, sleeves were detachable and thus the Lady Greensleeves was such a woman — so not really a Lady , then, in the Tudor sense of a titled noblewoman, at all.

This claim has no supporting evidence and is easily dismissed by the portraits of the women below, none of whom were prostitutes.

Indeed, renaissance prostitutes are not known for having the wealth to have their portrait painted, nor are they known to be the sort of women sought after as a love match by such as the moneyed man in Greensleeves. Besides which, where is the internal evidence in the song that the woman in question is a prostitute?

These questions only arise if there were the slightest evidence that renaissance prostitutes made themselves visible by wearing green or that the song contained any sign that the woman being unsuccessfully wooed is a prostitute. Where did the very idea of the Lady Greensleeves being a prostitute come from? A moderately inventive story, to be sure, but without considering the serious logistical difficulties of having illegal coitus in a public place.

It has the same reliance on evidence as the dog-heads. If the colour is meant to be significant — the love interest is, after all, given the name of her sleeves and their colour — then we also have the following symbolism of green clothes in the renaissance to choose from:. This was not just a matter of taste, but of law. The Sumptuary Laws had been in force since the 14 th century, and were several times strengthened during the Tudor reign.

The purpose of these laws was twofold: to maintain strict distinctions between social classes; and to protect the domestic wool trade by restricting the importation of foreign fabrics. They dictated, on pain of heavy financial fines and, in some cases, even imprisonment, the type of fabric, how much fabric, and the colours people could wear, all according to their social status and annual income.

Half of the fine would go to the monarch and the other half to the informant; and the offending uppity clothes-wearer was legally obliged to forfeit the garment. These laws of social status also applied to food, drink, furniture, and jewellery, and having been given such items as gifts was no defence for breaking the law.

The picture is complex but it seems that, in general, it was perceived that the potential power of men could threaten to undo the social order by wearing clothes above their rank; women much less so or, in , not at all. This is the outcome of a milieu where men held practically all the political and financial power and women were expected, in their subservience, to be no trouble except those in the households of labourers, who were hardly likely to be able to afford the proscribed clothes, anyway.

This is why she strung them along with her bogus marital intentions for as long as she could, to keep them quiet and maintain her position as sole monarch Alison Weir, Elizabeth the Queen , London: Vintage Books, I suggest we can detect something of this gender power dynamic in the words to Greensleeves.

After 14 verses describing all the gifts he has lavished upon the unresponsive object of his affections, we have:. He never seems to take the hint, despite her lack of interest. On the other hand, she did keep all the gifts. Strict and punitive as the Sumptuary Laws were in statute, they were widely ignored in practice. So many people were tempted by luxurious clothes that fines were rarely imposed.

Those that were caught would happily pay the fine and carry on as before. He does try to give evidence of a sort, but it is usually vague, general and irrelevant to the point he is trying to prove, making astounding leaps of assumption.

Sometimes he just makes it up. Instead, he claims its Irishness elsewhere in the book. A brief look at one of these Shakespeare songs will give you a flavour of the paucity of his reasoning. The very name has a reference to the saffron truis of the mediaeval Irish.

However, this does not mean that any general reference in Shakespeare or in any other contemporaneous English work to yellow stockings is necessarily a specific reference to Irish clothes. The cross-gartered yellow stockings in the context of the play are a ruse to make Malvolio look ridiculous in front of Olivia to comic effect, as she detests both cross-gartering and yellow stockings, so there is nothing specifically Irish about that.

It is true that one of the very earliest surviving written versions of the Greensleeves tune, perhaps the very first, is in a lute manuscript in Trinity College, Dublin, but we cannot claim that, because the manuscript is in Ireland, it is an Irish manuscript or has Irish musical content, any more than standing in a garage makes me a car.

Trinity College houses three late 16 th and early 17 th century handwritten lute books, which are:. This manuscript is particularly valuable for those interested in both early music and folk music, as it is the earliest source for many broadside ballad tunes, written in lute tablature in a straightforward fashion, without the complex divisions and variations so typical of the late Elizabethan period — and it is all the more valuable for this melodic clarity.

John M. Even the case of Callino Custurame is not at all straightforward, as this article explains. A few years previously, an Anglo-Irish Song was written to the tune of Greensleeves. The answer to all these questions is the same, and the same as most other questions in relation to Flood: he made it up. Anything claimed without evidence can be dismissed without evidence. A distantly-related idea I have come across is that slieve in Irish is mountain in English, that slieve sounds like sleeve , and that therefore Greensleeves is an Irish song.

It is by no means unknown for songs to mix languages. In modern pronunciation, slieve can be sleeve or slay-eve , and the equivalent word sliabh is pronounced schlee-u.

I cannot comment on 16 th century pronunciation of the word, or even if the word existed in 16 th century Irish. Where is the macaronic text of Greensleeves indicating the Irish spelling of the word for the English mountain? Where is there just one single example of a macaronic song entirely in one language except for a single word in another?

Where is the indication that the song, first published as a broadside ballad in England, has Irish origins? To finish off, and purely for completion, here are four more brief baseless circulating myths about Greensleeves.

The song name is a corruption of a surname such as Greenleaf or Gildersleeve, indicating she was a real person. Why must a name in a song with no biographical details link to an actual person?

Where is the evidence for a previous form of the name Greensleeves? A wandering minstrel fell in love with a woman who rejected him. The idea of the wandering minstrel is a modern romantic invention. Minstrels were employees. And have you ever noticed your sleeves going green through labouring outside? Mucky and sweaty is more likely. Baseless fantasy.



Sitemap

Yalnızlar Rıhtımı - Çelik - Unutamam (CD, Album), Dynamite, Heavens Gate - Various - Goa Volume 8 (CD), Semaphore - Jakob (3) - Cale:Drew (CD, Album), All My Love - Jag Wire - Made In Heaven (Cassette, Album), Getaway - Lee Ritenour - Lee Ritenour & His Gentle Thoughts (Vinyl, LP, Album), The Other Two - Selfish (Vinyl), Ich Werde Einmal Millionär, Gargoyle - Dinosaur Jr. - Chocomel Daze (Live 1987) (File, Album), Used To Be - Rory Gallagher - Deuce (Vinyl, LP, Album) Neg Anwo - Creole Choir Of Cuba - Tande-La (CD, Album)

8 Replies to “ Greensleeves and Yellow Lace - The City Waites - The Mufitians of Grope Lane (CD) ”

  1. Artist: City WaitesTitle: Mufitians of Grope Lane: Music of Brothels & BawdyProduct Type: COMPACT DISCSTracks Diddle Diddle or the Kind Country Lovers The Fair Maid of Islington Green Stockings The Jovial Lass or Dol and Roger Mundanga Was Lady of Pleasure The Old Wife The Beehive 1.
  2. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for The Mufitians of Grope Lane - City Waites on AllMusic - Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for The Mufitians of Grope Lane - City Waites on AllMusic - Greensleeves and Yellow Lace. Anonymous, English. City Waites:
  3. Apr 23,  · Listen to Greensleeves and Yellow Lace on Spotify. The Telemann Society Orchestra · Song · Music Duration: 4 min.
  4. The Musitians of Grope Lane The Musitians of Grope Lane Music of Brothels and Bawdy Houses of Purcell's England The Purcell Circle The City Waites - Douglas Wootton, dir. Musica Oscura Regis Records Contents: From Lavaenders Green; Diddle Diddle or the Kind Country Lovers; John Playford, The Dancing Master, ; The Fair Maid of.
  5. Bawdy Ballads of Old England / "The Mufitians of Grope Lane" / City Waites 18 Greensleeves and Yellow Lace 19 The jolly Brown Turd 20 Two Rounds: Tom Making a Manteau; When Celia was Learning 3.l6. 21 Lady Lie Near Me
  6. The City Waites - The Lusty Young Smith; The City Waites - Greensleeves and Yellow Lace; The City Waites - The Jolly Brown Turd; The City Waites - Two Rounds: Tom Making a Manteau / When Celia Was Learning; The City Waites - Lady Lie Near Me; The City Waites - Oh How You Protest; The City Waites - A Ditty Delightful of.
  7. cd、dvdの通販ならタワーレコードオンラインショップ。 The City Waites/The Mufitians of Grope Lane - Music of Brothels and Bawdy House of Purcell's England こんにちは.
  8. Buy a CD or Vinyl record and get 90 days free Amazon Music Unlimited With the purchase of a CD or Vinyl record dispatched from and sold by Amazon, you get 90 days free access to the Amazon Music Unlimited Individual plan. After your purchase, you will receive an email with further information. Terms and Conditions apply. Learn more.5/5(3).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *